Who said the Constitution isn’t a suicide pact?

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In United States history, various statesmen, jurists, politicians and even charlatans have invoked the idea that the U.S. Constitution is not a suicide pact.

Which is to say, in the face of clear and overriding public interest, the state cannot let mere laws prevent it from taking steps that are necessary to ensure the survival of the state and the people.

The Supreme Court has, in its wisdom, chosen to ignore that advice today.

Apparently, in the face of pandemic that has taken almost one million lives, the Court held today that the Constitution is indeed a suicide pact. The state, who we all will soon learn can force a woman to carry a pregnancy to term against her will, cannot force her to get a vaccine.

2 thoughts on “Who said the Constitution isn’t a suicide pact?”

  1. Well, this is one of the rare occasions that I wish I was an American.
    You have broken my balls with the general interest imposed through an experimental drug that does not immunize and does not prevent the circulation of the infection. You Marxists for Pfizer too. Greetings from the healthiest fascist nation in the world.

    P.S.
    When Soberana will be able to circulate freely and be officially recognized by the FDA and EMA, let’s talk about it again

    Like

    1. I am not qualified to debate the effectiveness of the vaccine and I actually doubt that it is all that effective. But that is not in dispute here. No justice on the court said the state can’t do this because it doesn’t work. The court, while believing this particular public health measure is effective, has said the state can’t force it on recalcitrant members of society because it is a personal choice. Since when is public health of a community a matter of private choice? Have you ever spat in a public subway?

      On the other hand, an actual private choice — whether to carry a rapist’s or your daddy’s bastard to term or not — will likely be forced on women in America within short order.

      The justices don’t appear to see the incongruity of their positions.

      Like

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